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From etiquette and politics, to a grower’s guide and a marijuana-specific cookbook, here are some of our favorite books about weed.

In places like Seattle, Denver or Los Angeles, buying weed is as easy as walking into a store and browsing for buds. What was once relegated to sketchy transactions with a friends’ friends’ friend has become as easy and elegant as consulting a budtender.

With more and more states legalizing the casual consumption of marijuana, and more and more people consuming pot products for the first time, we decided to roundup some of the best books about weed we could find. These books cover everything from marijuana’s road to decriminalization to amazing recipes that also happen to include cannabis, and even a book of Action Bronson’s random, stoned musings on his favorite flower.

– Read the entire article at Rolling Stone.

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So far, Canada’s cannabis legal grow-ops haven’t turned a profit as a group.

It’s good to be in a booming new business ― and in the case of Canadian cannabis, maybe more so for employees than employers, for now.

Cannabis producers haven’t yet turned a profit, but employment in the legal cannabis trade quadrupled between the 2017-18 fiscal year and 2018-19, according to new data from Statistics Canada. That was the period during which cannabis was legalized.

– Read the entire article at News.

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Moments before the age-old Rolling Stones began performing at Pasadena’s Rose Bowl Stadium on Thursday, actor Robert Downey Jr. inexplicably took to the stage and announced that the band was now the namesake of a rock on Mars.

When NASA’s InSight lander touched down on Mars back in November, its thrusters evidently displaced a rock, which subsequently rolled about three feet within view of the spacecraft’s onboard cameras. NASA had never seen a rock travel that far when landing on another planet. The event was confirmed after InSight took pictures the next day, and that “several divots in the orange-red soil can be seen trailing Rolling Stones Rock,” according to a press release.

While introducing the Rolling Stones onstage, Downey, Jr. briefly mentioned “two epic launches” that occurred in 1964: the release of the first Rolling Stones album, and the launch of the first flyby satellite to Mars, Mariner 4. He then praised NASA for its most recent mission to Mars, citing the movement of the rock and proclaiming that scientists at NASA’s Pasadena-based Jet Propulsion Laboratory, “in a fit of fandom and clever association,” decided to call it Rolling Stones Rock.

Downey continued to explain that the band members

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A law firm representing several clients in the cannabis industry is urging Weedmaps to set a date for its promised crackdown on unlicensed retailers advertising on the website. Attorneys with the firm Zuber Lawler said in a press release on Thursday that the move by Weedmaps will help support California’s legal cannabis industry and deal a blow to unlicensed operators.

“The decision by Weedmaps to cease carrying ads for unlicensed cannabis businesses is a critical step for wiping out the black market industry that undercuts legal retailers that play by the rules,” said Manny Medrano, a Zuber Lawler litigation partner. “It’s important to closely monitor this situation because despite Weedmaps’ announcement, the company provides no exact date for making the promised changes.”

On Wednesday, Weedmaps announced that “beginning later this year” it will require retail advertisers in the U.S. to provide a state license number on their listings on the cannabis information platform. Weedmaps CEO Chris Beals said in a press release that will help both consumers and legal cannabis businesses.

“These enhancements to existing safeguards on our platform will help patients and adult-use consumers find cannabis retailers that have provided evidence of state licensure,” Beals said. “It also underscores our

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A campaign to get a ballot measure in front of Florida voters to legalize recreational marijuana in 2020 was announced Thursday. It is backed by MedMen, one of the US cannabis industry’s largest companies. The Adult Use of Marijuana initiative would give the go-ahead to adults 21 years and older to buy and possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis.

The measure will be promoted via the dispensary chain’s “Make it Legal Florida” political committee, which was registered earlier this month. But it is not unopposed—the effort will face competition from “Sensible Florida,” a campaign started to thwart the proposed ballot measure.

The measure would not explicitly allow Floridians to grow their own cannabis for recreational use. That’s to be expected from MedMen, which was part of the New York Medical Cannabis Industry Association when the group sent a memo to Governor Cuomo last December claiming that home grow operations encouraged illegal sales, and put cannabis users in danger by making it difficult to monitor pesticide content. (MedMen was subsequently booted from the association over allegations of sexist and racist comments and financial misdeeds by company leaders.)

MedMen currently has a medical marijuana dispensary in Florida’s West Palm Beach, and

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Crohn’s disease is an autoimmune disease that causes severe irritation and inflammation in the digestive tract. A form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the condition often develops in young adults between the ages of 20 and 29 and has no known cure.

Complications from Crohn’s disease include intestinal obstruction or fistulas, abscesses, ulcers, and ultimately malnutrition as the body is not receiving adequate nutrients. Prescription medications are frequently used to treat Crohn’s patients, but they come with a host of side effects, such as chronic pain and respiratory infection.

Cannabis has demonstrated effectiveness in treating other autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, but could it provide the same advantages to patients with Crohn’s disease?

– Read the entire article at Bezinga.

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In marijuana’s march to mainstream acceptance, high-end fragrances are tapping into a desire for earthy, woodsy creations.

“Reeking of weed” used to be a bad thing. Now high-end beauty influencers are embracing fragrances designed to highlight the aroma of cannabis.

There’s one called Dirty Grass, an earthy $185 scent with 500 milligrams of hemp-derived CBD oil in each bottle. It’s the latest release from Heretic Parfum’s Douglas Little, the nose behind Goop’s all-natural fragrances. Another, Chronic ($175), is from Swedish brand 19-69 and contains notes of grapefruit and moss. Both are available at Barneys New York.

They join the likes of Malin + Goetz’s Cannabis Eau De Parfum ($165), which balances white floral notes with spicy herbs, and Maison Margiela’s Replica ($126), an ode to the Woodstock music festival that is described as smelling of “patchouli and fresh bud.”

– Read the entire article at News.

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A new law going into effect later this month will protect the rights of medical marijuana patients and establish regulations for the state’s fledgling medicinal cannabis industry. House Bill 2612, or the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana and Patient Protection Act, as the measure is also known, will go into effect on Friday, August 30.

Oklahoma lawmakers passed House Bill 2612 earlier this year to establish regulations after the medicinal use of cannabis was legalized by voters with the passage of State Question 788 in June 2018. Seen as a compromise between lawmakers intent on regulating the industry and patient advocates who campaigned for the constitutional amendment initiative, the Medical Marijuana and Patient Protection Act has also been referred to as the Unity Bill.

The measure enacts regulations for medical marijuana providers including packaging and labeling requirements. The new law also protects patient access by prohibiting strict requirements such as a ban on smokable cannabis flower or limits on the amount of THC in medical marijuana products.

Bill Protects Patients’ Jobs

House Bill 2612 also has employment protections for medical marijuana patients, including a ban on firing an employee or refusing to hire an applicant based “solely on the basis of a

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Over the last couple years, medical marijuana in Utah has been a hot and controversial subject. In what has become a protracted, back-and-forth process between state legislators, medical marijuana advocates, and other powerful players in the state, Utah’s medical marijuana program continues to undergo dramatic changes.

Now, state lawmakers are preparing to make another significant change. Specifically, they said they will soon eliminate a proposal to distribute medical cannabis through state and county health departments. Instead, medical marijuana in the state will be sold through a network of privately owned and operated dispensaries.

New Changes to Utah’s Medical Marijuana Program

As reported by local news source Fox 13 Salt Lake City, lawmakers are set to introduce the new change in a special session of the State Legislature.

Importantly, this change will overhaul the state’s planned system for distributing medical marijuana. Up until now, the state planned on using a “central fill” system. In this framework, all medical marijuana would be distributed and sold through state and local health departments.

The plan sparked controversy when it was passed at the end of 2018. Specifically, many medical marijuana advocates pointed out that the program would run into problems, as it essentially forces

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From Washington to main street, changes to U.S. drug policy are evident. CBD products line the aisles at supermarkets and convenience stores. And emboldened by a new law that permits hemp cultivation, states across America are considering the crop as a new agricultural cornerstone.

Those changes do not, however, extend to the U.S. military. The Department of Defense issued a stern warning to its servicemembers this week: steer clear of hemp-derived products such as cannabidiol, better known as CBD.

“It’s completely forbidden for use by any service member in any of the services at this point of time,” said Patricia Deuster, director of the Human Performance Laboratory at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, as quoted by Military.com.

The warning comes on the heels of similar guidelines issued by the nation’s sea services, with the Navy, Coast Guard and Marines all warning members that, despite changes to state and federal law, the military policy remains the same.

The need to clarify the policy stems in part from the Agriculture Improvement Act, better known as the 2018 Farm Bill, which legalized the regulated industrial production of hemp, a move that inspired several states to pursue cultivation

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